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Rheumatism

Rheumatism

Cannabis has long been one of the major treatments for rheumatism. This was a classical use of cannabis in the 19th century when it was reported as being as effective as opium for severe rheumatism.

More than 1.5 million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (rheumatism). It is a condition that is often life-long and very painful. Those with this chronic type of arthritis typically have difficulty enjoying a normal life. They may rely on pain and anti-inflammatory medications. Many times they are not enough.

CBD oil can be used to treat rheumatoid arthritis without any of the side of effects of traditional medications. This article explains what rheumatoid arthritis is and how marijuana (and CBD oil) can help relieve symptoms.

What is rheumatism

Rheumatism, more commonly known as rheumatoid arthritis, is a disease that leads to pain and inflammation in the joints. You are unlikely to hear it called by this name these days since it has fallen out of usage by the medical community, but people do occasionally call it rheumatism.

Rheumatism, or rheumatoid arthritis, happens when the body mistakenly attacks its own cells. It is an autoimmune disease, and the target is the body’s joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause occasional pain or constant pain, but generally speaking, the pain is severe. More about rheumatism om wikipedia.

What causes rheumatism

Research does not yet know the root cause of rheumatoid arthritis, although there seems to be a genetic component. This does not mean your genes lead directly to rheumatism. It means that those with a certain gene are more susceptible to factors in the environment (such as an infection) that will cause you to contract the disease.

Causes of Rheumatism

Causes of Rheumatism

What’s more, even if you have the gene, certain people are at more risk. Women are more likely than men to have rheumatism. Older people tend to suffer from it, as it commonly sets in between 40 and 60. Plus, being overweight or smoking makes you more likely to develop the disease. There is no vaccine for rheumatism, but staying healthy and avoiding those triggers can help even those with the gene from developing it.

Symptoms of rheumatism

Rheumatism may start slow, and progressively become worse. The early stages can be seen in the smaller joints, like fingers and toes. In the later stages, the disease will impact larger parts of the body, such as knees, hips, elbows and shoulders. It can also affect parts of your body that are not even joints, such as skin, eyes, nerve tissue, kidneys, and bone marrow.

In severe cases, rheumatism can cause joints to deform and even shift out of place, which is why it’s important to make sure to see a doctor if you believe that you may have the disease. Check the 15 early symptoms & signs of rheumatism at this link.

Complications from rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis, especially untreated, can lead to many additional complications down the road. Osteoporosis can be caused by the condition itself or by medications used to treat it, as can infections.

Rheumatism complcation

Rheumatism complcation

Long-term inflammation also increases the risk for other conditions, such as heart problems, lung disease, and blood cancer. Because there can be so many complications that can lead to increased pain or even death, it’s vital to care for your rheumatoid arthritis, reduce inflammation whenever possible and take every step you can to stay in good health.

Current treatments for rheumatism

It’s not possible to cure rheumatoid arthritis, but the pain can be managed. There are a number of options for treating rheumatism, and they are most of the same options that are available for treating other forms of arthritis or chronic inflammation.

A doctor may also prescribe physical therapy to help heal the joints and teach the patient how to safely perform daily tasks while in pain. There are also pharmaceutical treatments available, but these can have difficult side effects that lead to more challenges.

CBD as a treatement for rheumatoid arthritis

If you’re looking for a safe, natural treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, CBD might be your answer. Research on using CBD to treat arthritis (as well as other diseases) have been very promising:

In this 2015 study, researchers evaluated more than half a century of data on the use of marijuana for chronic pain and other diseases. The research included 325 patients experiencing chronic pain. This is relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients because the condition often includes large amounts of pain. The researchers found many indications that marijuana can significantly improve the quality of life for patients who use it. The study’s authors also recommended that doctors educate their patients on the possibilities of using cannabis to treat their pain.

CBD as a treatment for Rheumatism

CBD as a treatment for Rheumatism

The study at this link study looked at 58 patients who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis over the course of five weeks. The double-blind study found that the cannabis-based medicine had significantly better results than a placebo in reducing pain and increasing quality of sleep.

This study, published in 2006, was the first one to ever study using medical marijuana to treat rheumatoid arthritis in a controlled trial. It showed that there is a lot of potential for using cannabis-based medicines to treat rheumatism.

Have you ever tried medical marijuana and did it work out for you? Please share your experience in the comments below.

CBD vs THC

When you smoke, inhale, or eat marijuana, you are ingesting two very powerful ingredients. (We’ll discuss the different ways of consuming the marijuana plant in the next section) Those two ingredients are known as CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Depending on the strain of marijuana, the proportions of these two ingredients can vary, and therefore the drug’s impact on the body can also vary.

THC vs CBD

THC vs CBD

THC is the ingredient that leads to most of the well-recognized effects of cannabis. It is psychoactive, so it gives the feeling of being “high,” which is why many recreational users seek out strains with high concentrations of THC. It can also lead to feelings of anxiety or even paranoia and may result in tiredness.

If you want to use marijuana for medical purposes, such as treating your rheumatism, you’ll want to look for a strain that’s high in CBD. CBD is non-psychoactive, causes wakefulness, and even prevents feelings of paranoia and anxiety.

Examples of high CBD strains are Blueberry, Gold Leaf and Train Wreck

It’s also highly effective at reducing inflammation; which is useful for Rheumatoid arthritis since as an autoimmune disorder it includes chronic inflammation. CBD also balances THC’s effects, when taken together.

How to take medical marijuana

Usually, when people think of marijuana, they think of smoking. For most people, their first experience with the substance comes from joints, where someone rolls the plant in paper and then smokes it. While smoking is certainly a popular method of ingesting cannabis and can work for medical purposes as well as it does for recreational use, it’s not the only option available to you. So, if you dislike the sensation of smoking, want to be able to use the drug without smelling of it, or want a different kind of high, one of the other methods might work better for you.

For example, some people enjoy vaping, which involves putting the dried plant or cannabis extract into a small machine and then inhaling its vapors. The machine can be somewhat expensive, but vaping is easier on the lungs than standard smoking, and it won’t leave a lingering smell on you or your clothing.

Medical Marijuana for Rheumatism

Medical Marijuana for Rheumatism

It’s also possible to eat food with cannabis in it. Most people are familiar with “magic brownies,” but brownies are far from the only food that can be turned into an edible. There are cookies, crackers, ice cream, and even lollipops available. Additionally, people have developed recipes to make these snacks and treats quite tasty.

Keep in mind that when you consume marijuana through an edible, it will take longer to get into your system. So make sure not to eat more than the recommended dosage just because you aren’t feeling the effects immediately. The effects also last longer than they do from smoking – so don’t make plans immediately following when you plan to ingest.

If none of those options sound good, you can consider one of the myriad other ways of consuming the cannabis plant, such as a tea, spray, topical, oil or even eating the plant raw. If you’ve tried smoking, vaping, and edibles and none of them have appealed to you, it's worth trying one of these less common methods to see if it’s a better fit.

Grow your own arthritis  medication

Across the country, medical marijuana is becoming more accepted. The plant is surprisingly simple to grow, and by growing it yourself, you can save quite a bit of money and stay in complete control of what you are consuming. Best of all, it doesn’t take that many plants to have an ample supply of medication, plus many states allow patients to grow more than one at a time.

If you’ve found that marijuana is effective in treating your rheumatism and you would like to grow your own, first purchase some seeds, then, learn how to grow from the experts. Many  strains, such as Blueberry or Train Wreck are ideal for people with rheumatism.

Tip: make sure to download my free Grow Bible to grow your own medication

If you’ve ever grown plants before, you’ll find caring for your new marijuana plant to be very familiar – just make sure it gets the recommended water and sunlight, and wait for it to flower. Once it's grown, simply prepare the plant based on your preferred method of ingestion for some home-grown pain relief.

Although rheumatoid arthritis may never go away completely, at least now with the use of CBD and medical marijuana, you can manage your pain and continue to live a pain-free life.

Have you ever tried medical marijuana and did it work out for you? Please share your experience in the comments below.

Robert

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Comment Section

6 thoughts on “Rheumatism


By Shelly on 14 December 2014

Hi Robert. I have followed you for a while, and am in my first grow. I need to control what goes into my body. Am an expert gardener, and the "girls" are doing GREAT. Question for you, serious one. I am one of the two most serious Rheumatoid Arthritis patients a major teaching hospital in Boston, MA, USA. I have medication-resistent RA, and my IVs fail every 1-2 years. Just came off of 7 hospitalizations this summer. Developed severe "opioid-induced hyperalgesia", basically, the f'd up narcotics I was on made my body melt. Gee. I am growing 1 Moby Dick XXL, 2 RoadRunner, and 3 Speedy Gonzales now. What do YOU recommend for RA? Thanks so much. I believe in the cause. I am so much better with my OWN medicine, but need the best recommendation you can give me for my next grow specific to disease. Thanks so much Robert.


By gayle behn on 19 August 2015

I really do not want 2 smoke marijuana. I just want 2 grow it 4 the oil. how do u make thc oil?


By Ems on 6 June 2017

I’ve been taking cbd for just over three months now for my severe rheumatoid arthritis. I’ve been able to cut back on my steroids for the first time in years. These pills help me tremendously. I highly suggest using them for inflammation. Thank you. – Ems


By Sherry on 2 September 2017

I just want to share my experience with CBD. It works well for me. I have rheumatoid arthritis, and I use CBD on my knees, knuckles and fingers. I really helps me sleep better at night.


By Joe on 2 February 2018

So far our experience with CBD oil is very good. My friend has RA and after taking the water soluble CBD for about two weeks she is feeling a significant difference. I also have some stiffness and mild joint pain and the CBD seems to be helping. We are both looking forward to seeing how we feel after a month of use. -Joe

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