Transplanting Marijuana Plants

Transplanting marijuana plants can be one of the trickiest parts of growing cannabis. It may seem overwhelming, but when properly researched it can be done with ease by just about anyone.

Once your plants have established a stable root system, they are ready for a period of major foliage growth.

So what makes transplanting cannabis so important? What would even happen if you didn’t do it? In this article, we will answer those questions, and will dive into the following topics:

The following symptoms are signs that your plant is rootbound:

  1. Stunted Growth
  2. Stretching
  3. Smaller and slower bud production
  4. Needs watering too often
  5. Easy to burn with low % nutrient solution mixtures
  6. Wilting
  7. Red stems
Rootbound cannabis example
Roots have wrapped around the edges and growing upwards. Classic signs of a rootbound plant. 420mag

The right time to transplant your cannabis plants is when they have an established, sturdy root system in place. This is the case when the roots grow out of the bottom of the pot. The plant is ready to focus its energy on vegetative growth now, so it needs to be moved to a larger container.

Note: Marijuana plants need around 2 gallons of soil for each foot of growth… Read all about it in my Grow Guide.

You will need to educate yourself about how to do this properly, since making even a small mistake during the process could have a devastating effect. You will also have to carefully choose where you are going to put your cannabis plants permanently to live out their adult lives.

Transplanting cannabis plants at this stage is always necessary, regardless of how you sprouted your plants to begin with. They simply cannot thrive if they are grown in containers for their whole lives, so you cannot avoid the transplantation process. The best way to deal with this is through research and planning.

check plant roots
Check for roots. Image from Bergmans Lab
remove from pot
Carefully remove from pot. Image from Bergmans Lab
transplant to pot
Transplant to larger pot. Image from Bergmans Lab

So what could happen if you make a mistake while transplanting your cannabis plants? Your plants could go into shock, which might cause their leaves to turn yellow and then wither, finally dying and dropping off the plant altogether. In some more serious cases, the plant itself could actually die from the trauma.

While risky, transplanting your plants will have an overwhelmingly positive effect (when done responsibly). It will help speed up the maturing process of the plant while simultaneously requiring even less hands-on care from you as the grower. In summary, it’s well worth the risk and hassle in the end.

Download my free Grow Bible for more more troubleshooting tips

Indoor or outdoor transplanting?

Before beginning the transplanting process, you will first need to make some decisions about your permanent grow site. The location is everything, as it will determine your cannabis plantsgrowing environment (and, therefore, their rate of success) as well as your own security.

If you want more control over the environment in which your plants are growing, you may be interested in setting up a permanent grow site indoors. With this method, you can grow all your plants in larger separate containers of some sort (check these containers).

Whether you prefer indoor or outdoor growing, you can buy high-quality seeds from my seed shop.

Transplanting marijuana indoors
Transplanting marijuana indoors

This can be a great way to ensure the health of your plants since you would control every aspect of their lives. On the other hand, growing your cannabis plants indoors will also require you to use a lot more money, time, and effort. Whether it is light, food, water, temperature or ventilation, you will have to provide it yourself.
For growers on a budget or who prefer a more natural method of growing, setting up a grow site outdoors might make the most sense. It costs much less in both money and effort.

Transplanting marijuana plants outdoors

That being said, with this method it is even more important to choose the right grow site for your plants, since it will have a significant effect on both the environment around your plants, as well as your own personal security. It will need to be a safe place with easy access, where you can ensure safety for both yourself and your cannabis plants.

When to transplant

The basic idea behind transplanting at a certain time is to do it when your plants’ roots have reached as far as they can grow within the constraints of their container. Roots actually tend to grow further and faster when they are enclosed in a container; it’s almost as if they are eager to reach open space as soon as possible.

when to transplant marijuana plants

Strangely enough, roots that are already planted straight into the ground do not grow with the same amount of urgency. So what happens if you leave your plants in a container for too long? The answer is simple: they’ll just stop growing altogether.

Containers are not the only thing guilty of causing such a response in the plant. Peat plugs can do the same thing since their mesh perimeter usually acts as a hindrance to the roots, and they stop growing as if they were contained in a plastic pot. This will cause them to stop growing as well.

Once your cannabis plants have sprouted, two leaves that are oblong in shape will start to be visible. These are called cotyledons and they come out from the one tiny stem that will pop up from the soil. They don’t resemble the easily recognized marijuana leaves, but after just a few days they will drop off and normal marijuana leaves will emerge. This shows you that your plants are beginning their seedling phase of life.

transplating weed

Plants in this phase are still relatively small in size, but their roots will begin to grow and develop into a proper root system. This system, though nicely developed, is still quite fragile.

You cannot yet move your plants while they are in their seedling phase, but do ensure that they have plenty of light and water (or just moisture in the soil). The seedling phase can be between two and six weeks long. Read How to grow strong plants ready to transplant

So how can you identify the time when your plants are ready for transplantation?

Doing it too early would be devastating for your tender seedlings, so you must act with caution. Once you suddenly are seeing faster growth of leaves as well as a firmer stem. You can test the firmness of the stem by grabbing it with your hand (gently) without doing any damage to it. If these things are happening to your young plants, they have officially entered the vegetative growth stage of their life.

transplating cannabis plants

You can, of course, begin the growing season a bit earlier by using peat plugs. This is ideal for growers who are located in climates where the growing season is naturally shorter.

If you do go with peat plugs, make sure you are always aware of the mesh perimeters and whether root tendrils are emerging from underneath them. As soon as you see this you will need to transplant the seedlings into a bigger container or else into the ground outdoors. If you don’t, the growth of your plant could remain stunted forever.

Download my free Grow Bible for more more troubleshooting tips

How to transplant

The first thing you need to do when transplanting your plants to a new, permanent location is to choose a spot for it. There are three types of locations that you can choose between.

The first one is an indoor location that can be accessed with ease, but is not easily noticed by other people. A second option would be to move your plants outdoors, where many of the valuable resources they need come at no cost to you. The third option is a sort of indoor-outdoor hybrid: you can move your plants to larger containers, but in turn move these containers outdoors temporarily.

During the first 3 weeks of flowering root-binding can seriously decrease your yield. The buds and leaves wont continue to grow because the plant cant grow new roots to support them.

If you are most concerned about the discovery of your plants, the third option might be for you because it means that you will be able to quickly relocate your crop in case of detection. It also works well for moving your plants away from pests.

Out of the three options, moving your plants from one container to another is most likely the simplest and most straightforward option available to you.

No matter what option you choose to go with, there are a few key factors to your successful transplantation. First and most obviously, you need to make sure that new soil (whether in the ground or in containers) is fully prepared before you begin the transplantation process.

transplanting marijuana process

Pictures powered by: Bergmanslab.com

If you are moving the plants into new pots, make sure that each pot is 4 gallons at the very smallest if it’s their permanent container. If you are going to move your plants to an outdoor location, simply dig a hole that is a few inches greater in size than the pots that your plants have been living in thus far. Make sure to have piles of dug up soil around the hole as well, so that you can push it back in once you have completed the move.

You should actually keep the plants in the soil that they have already been growing since it will reduce the amount of shock that it undergoes, and will instead ease your plant into its new environment. If you have grown your plants within a closet until now, they are especially susceptible to shock, so be particularly cautious.

The next factor that you need to pay attention to is the condition of the soil that your plants are currently living in. It needs to be moist but not wet, and not dry enough to crumble. The most important thing is that your soil sticks together during the transplantation, keeping the shape of its original container (wiki on transplanting).

The process is simple. Put the palm of your hand on the soil in its original pot, keeping the plant’s stem between two of your middle fingers. Your other hand should be beneath the plant. Using both hands, smoothly flip the pot upside-down, putting the full contents and weight of the plant and its soil into your hand that’s holding the stalk of the plant.

Then put away the container, as you will no longer be needing it, and put your hand back on the bottom of the contents, where you should be able to see the white tendrils of the roots. You then put the whole thing into one of the holes you have already dug in the ground.

Do not panic if large pieces of soil fall from the roots of the plant. Your only priority is getting the plant’s roots back underground and covered completely with soil. With a peat plug, the mesh surrounding your plant’s roots should be pulled off and discarded since your plant will no longer be engulfed by water.

Once you have pushed all the soil onto plant’s roots, make sure to give those roots plenty of water. Use up a full gallon that has added plant food.

cannabis plants being transplanted

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The last step is simply to cover up the soil that has been exposed to natural debris and leaves that are already at this location. This will both slow down the evaporation of the water you just poured, as well as camouflage your garden from unexpected discovery.

Once the plant is fully grown you will need to start thinking about flowering and harvest time. Our free little Harvest Guide will help you determine the best moment to cut your plants. Download it here.

Transplanting tips

When you are transplanting your cannabis plants, there are a few specific things you should be sure to avoid. The following steps are most important to remember when going through a transplant:

  • Avoid watering your plants for a day or two before the planned transplant.
  • Always take care of the roots. In other words, don’t touch them. The less the roots are disturbed during the transplant, the more likely that it will be successful.
  • Use nutrients that are only half-strength in your water, and water your plant immediately after its transplant.
  • Avoid hitting your plant with intense light in the first one or two days directly after the transplant.
  • Download my free Grow Bible for more tips

Looking for a specific marijuana strain to grow? Visit my seed bank now to find your favorite seed.

The whole process can be risky, but when some simple measures are taken to lower that risk, you should have a highly successful transplant and harvest.

FAQ About Transplanting Marijuana

Is it bad to transplant during flowering?

Always transplant your weed plant before it enters the flowering stage to ensure that it gets plenty of room for its roots.

How long to wait to feed the plant after a transplant?

You should water your plant and feed it half-strength nutrients immediately after transplanting it.

When to transplant seedlings from a solo cup?

Wait until after the seedling phase to transplant the seedling. The stem should be firmer by then making the transplanting process less risky.

Download our free Ganja Livity lifestyle guide to learn more about rolling perfect joints!

Thanks for reading. Please leave comments or questions about transplanting cannabis below and don’t forget to download my free grow bible

Robert

Robert Bergman

Robert Bergman is an Amsterdam-based marijuana grow expert who has years of experience from small grows to massive operations. His passion for growing lead him to develop his own Gold Leaf strain. Now, Robert is dedicated to sharing his knowledge with the world.... [Read full bio]

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    179 comments on “Transplanting Marijuana Plants”

    Leave a Comment

    1. Hi Romey,

      Most of our strains for sale we breed ourselves. Only on rare occassions do we buy seeds. But, only from our own trusted suppliers here in Amsterdam.

      Our seeds are sold in the ILGM seedshop:

      http://www.ilovegrowingmarijuana.com/seeds

      Go over there and check-out some of our delicious strains 🙂

      Happy growing,

      Robert Bergman

      Reply
      • They are the best ever the first time my seeds got crushed not there fault with in ten days got fresh new amber golden seeds day one in water cup seed is starting to split slightly the best qaulity team and customer service ever

        Reply
    2. I have transplanted one of my babies into its permanent growing pot and while i was transplanting one of the many many roots kinda was stuck to 2 liter bottom and while transplanting got pulled off just a little though was curious if any thoughts on if that will be the one thing that kills it or does it matter since there are so many others could you email with resopnse please..

      Reply
    3. robert ,,a friend have a plant bt it is in no so good soil , i want to transplant it in a new prepared soil , but the soil where now is to thick and roots cant spread easy,how to take all the bad soil out of the roots?and how to tranplant it?

      Reply
    4. I live in the USA. I noticed that it is not listed in the country list. Does this mean we are sanctioned (haha)

      Reply
      • Hi Lisaray,
        The USA is where almost all our visitors, friends and clients are from! No clue what you mean with the USA not being listed in a country list. Both reading our blog from the USA, and shipping our products to the USA, are free! 🙂

        Happy growing,

        Robert Bergman

        Reply
    5. robert please tell me when to transplant from indoor light box to large outdoor pots ? thank you

      Reply
      • This is a matter of choice, and once experienced can be varied to fit your needs.

        Before planting outdoors; You must do 2 things; 1. Make sure you have established a strong root zone, and the plant is strong enough to withstand wind. 2. The transition from indoor to outdoors need to be done a little at a time over a few days. The Sun is much brighter than you lamps, oso it is good to keep the plant in t eh 1-3 gallon pot indoors. Use this to move in and out for an hour one day6, monitoring the response of the plant. If all goes well, try 2-4 hours the next day. If all goes well, you can probably take one more day at 6-8 hours, and then replant into large vessel and leave outdoors. hope this helps. 🙂

        Reply
    6. Last year we planted six plants. The plants were very small (short). What did I do wrong, they were very healthy and produced a good amount. We planted them on the south west side of a shed they missed the morning sun but got the afternoon and evening sun. Could this be why I lie in the California dessert. Thanks so much for all the info you give

      Reply
      • It would be better if you placed your plants to receive Morning Sun. Avoid “hot” Afternoon Sun; Or, Supply shade cloth to keep from burning up your plants .

        Reply
      • Is most of Ur evening sun redish?? Morning sun the light is more blue witch will. Abuse Ur plants to grow tall just like using a Bleu led light for indoor grow but during evening and afternoon the sun is going down witch gives out a redish color in the sky using a red led light during indoor grow will cause Ur plant to get short stems will also give u a good enough yield but just won’t grow as tall. Try and make sur Ur plant gets the morning sun and after noon chears

        Reply
    7. Hey! I’m in need of help. I have to explain my situation but I’ll try to make it brief 🙂
      Ok, sometime when breaking down my herb (very rare this happens) I find a seed, or a friend finds a seed. I have a house plant and i just started to stick the seeds that were found inside my plant pot. It’s probably been about 6 months since I found a seed, and 8 months to 1 yr for the other seeds I’ve found and just put in plant pot. My friends told me it wouldn’t grow but I said “what the heck, why not put it in the pot with my house plant”…so allllllllllll these months pass by, and I happen to look at my plan & see two sprouts growing up from the dirt. One is longer than the other. The one that is a little longer has spread two long leave + two short leaves…

      My question to you is what should I do next??? I was not expecting it to grow! And remember it has been many months since those seeds have been in dirt. AND it’s in a pot with my actual house plant..HELP!!!!

      plz n thnx in advance

      Reply
    8. Kevin. This is hard to say. Some genetics “Indica” will stay shorter and bushier. Auto-flowers tend to be smaller. The problem is; You have given us no indication of what type seeds you used. 🙂 Please join the forum, and post this topic there so we can help you more efficiently. Peace

      Reply
    9. Thnx for your response 🙂

      Any particular soil/dirt I should use?? I’m going to use some of the soul it started growing with so I don’t shock the babies lol…and surround it with new soil/dirt

      Reply
    10. Any good composted soil would work good. Make sure it is ammended and not too hot for the roots. If you can afford it Foxfarm is a great soil, but expensive. They make 2 or 3 different mixes. Miracle grow makes a soil called Organic choice. I have used this and had good results. Very affordable 🙂

      Finally; You can mix your own.
      1. Sterile dirt. (clean topsoil dirt with no additives or fertilizer value)
      2, Perlite 1/3
      3. Promix BX (nursery product) Ingredients:
      SPHAGNUM PEAT MOSS (75-85%)
      PERLITE
      VERMICULITE
      LIMESTONE (buffers PH)
      WETTING AGENT
      MYCORRHIZAE™ PREMIER TECH (Glomus intraradices)

      ProMixBX is available at farm and ag supply stores. 4CF for approx. 35-40 bucks. Great deal B

      Reply
    11. Hello, question?.. i had to pull my plants out of the ground.. they have not budded yet and they are about 4 feet tall.. what can be done to stop them from dying? is there any immediate advice to give? as they were pulled today…

      Reply
      • Join our support forum for expert advice.

        Copy/Paste a “support ticket”; It is easy to find.

        You have not provided any info on how you were growing or what method was used; Etc…Etc
        Place each one in a 5 gallon of water to kep them alive.

        Or; wrap them in a cloth and keep them moist

        Reply
    12. Hello
      I am growing gold leaf strain outside. it is over 8 ft tall and into the second week of flowering. its in a 5 gal. cloth smart pot. It is so root bound now its getting top heavy and is getting hard to water.
      My question is i just got a 10 gal smart pot and i am wondering if i should transplant it ?
      It is very healthy and starting to bud nicely. A huge monster in a small pot.

      Thanks

      Reply
      • thai
        This is a touchy subject.

        ON one hand; If you do not re-pot the plant; it will finish faster. We use this method of growing in a smaller pot in order to trick Sativas into finishing faster. If you are happy with the potential yield you may get; Leave it alone in the pot. For watering; Buy a watering wand that allows you 2-3 feet of extra reach.

        Alternatively; I just removed a plant from a smart pot, and it was hard to remove. So; Iust say you would be taking a chance. This is going to have to be your call. However; If i really wanted to put this plant in a 10 gallon SP; I would consider carefully cutting the 5 gallon SP off the plant. The yield is worth considerably more than the cloth pot. 🙂

        If the plant is top heavy; Get some metal fence stakes, drive them into the ground all around the plant, and tie the main stem off with twine.

        Reply
        • Thank you latewood.
          I was not worried about yield as much as plant health. This was a extra plant that out grew my grow room so i put it outside. The gold leaf strain was awesome inside. I cant wait to see how it turns out grown outside. But i am thinking its over 8 ft now it should get over 10 ft. when ready to harvest. 10 ft tall in a 5 gal pot looks funny.
          But i have 8-9 weeks left of flowering maby i will transplant it and see how big it will get.
          Thanks again for your time and help.

          Reply
          • Thanks for the follow up. I am thrilled to hear you have a 10 foot tall plant….YyyyeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeHHHHHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaHHHH!!!

            Reply
    13. Hello
      I have several new plants growing Hydroponic with Rapid Rooter in 2 inch starter plugs.
      When should I transplant these and into what method Dirt or continue with the Hydroponics.
      Newbie here and want my plants to survive.. Also what should I use to keep my plants standing up as the are almost a foot tall now.
      thanks

      Reply
      • You are not growing hydroponically. You are starting your genetics in rapid rooters. Once the seedling has roots penetrating the outer walls of the RR, you can transplant into any medium or method you choose.

        Reply
    14. Not at all. Go ahead with your transplant. Be aware to not damage the roots too much. If plant were still in veg; I would advise you to scruff up the roots a bit, but in flower, you do not need stress or a bunch of new useless little stems growing at the bottom of the main stem. 🙂

      Reply
    15. Bruce knowles,
      FFR: You should never start more than 1 plant per pot.

      I can only advise you, that if you do attempt to separate them, you will have to be very careful not to damage the tap root. One method that may help you, would be to fill a large vessel with cool to luke warm water. Take plant out of container, and bathe in the vessel of water. All medium should break down ad fall off from around the root ball. At this point, you may be able to separate the 2 plants.

      Another idea would be to transplant the entire thing into a much larger pot, and allow both plants to thrive..

      Reply
    16. I’m a beginner at growing and I have a question about the whole transplanting concept. After germinating your seed and planting it in a small pot or container, why can’t you just plant your seedling straight into a large pot or container and eliminate the whole process of transplanting?

      Reply
    17. You do not want to plant into a big pot at the beginning, becuase the plants roots will grow straight to the bottom. By stepping up from a starter pot, to a 1 gallon-6liter pot, then to a 3-5 gallon pot; You get much more advantage from your medium, and more all around vigorous growth.

      Reply
    18. I agree and i disagree on your transplant ideas. I use a propagator to germinated my seeds, along with 1 inch rock wool cubes. I soak the cubes in 5.5 ph’ed water for a couple of hours. Next i place my seeds inside the hole provided in the rock wool cube. Then i pull a small piece of rock wool off the side of the cube and cover my seed with it. Now this is only a small piece big enough to cover the seed. I open the four vents on my propagator and turn on the lights. My propagator is only about 8 inches long, 6 inches wide and 6 inches tall. I take my rock wool cubes out of the ph’ed water and let them drip a few seconds, but i do not shake or squeeze water out of them. P place the rock wool cubes on a bed of perlite, which covers the bottom of the propagator, about 1/8 inch deep. I do nothing to the seeds before placing them into the cubes. The seeds pop within 24 to 48 hours. I wait up to 5 days before transplanting my seedlings, rock wool cubes included, into their final containers. So i have germinated my seeds, turned them into seedlings, and transplanted the seedlings into final containers. I have done this in a five day period from the time i placed the seeds into the propagator. My success rate is 98% using this method. If a seed is not viable of course it will not pop, and sometimes you do have seeds that pop for you but do not make it past a week. I also spray my seedling each day with two or three squirts from my misting spray bottle with 5.5 ph’ed water, and i do this EVERY day until they are transplanted into final containers.
      I transplant my seedlings into final containers by wetting the complete container of grow medium the seedling will be transplanted into one day before transplant. Next i did a small hole in the middle of the final container that will allow 1/2 inch of the seedling stem to stick above the medium line (so if the seedling and rock wool cube together are 5 inches, then i dig a 5 1/2 inch deep hole to place the seedling and rock wool cube into. Next i push a small amount of grow medium around the rock wool cube and pour enough water around the cube to compact the grow medium. I continue to do this until the 1/2 inch of the top of the seedling is left sticking out. I usually only use 400ml of 5.5 ph’ed water for each seedling. Now i am done with transplanting. I grow in coco/perlite mix (75% coco/25% perlite), so i give my seedlings 400ml of water every other day for a week, or 7 days. My success rate is 98% using this method. I used this method on my current grow, which includes 7 Blackjack feminized seeds, 7 Pure Power Plant seeds, and 5 Swiss Cheese Auto seeds. The plants are now six weeks old. I had 100% success with my germination and transplanting. I try not to stress my auto plants in any way, especially when they are seedlings, and the same with my photo period plants, so this is why i transplant when they are this young. It works great for me, and i don’t see why it would not work for anyone else. My plants start getting nutrients when they are one week old from the date of transplanting, so they can grow a massive root system, which we all know, turns into the reason we are growing cannabis. Peace

      Reply
    19. Is it true that clones does not produce a taproot if yes outdoor growing with clones would be harder wouldn’t it are is that not true about cloned

      Reply
      • ak47luver

        A taproot is the main root produced when seed p[ropagation occurs. All other roots come from this taproot.

        From clones many roots appear off the cutting. Now Other roots will form of these new roots but, I would not call them a true taproot.

        It does not make any difference which root system you use; Indoors, or Outdoors. It is about your medium and methods of growing that make or break you outside. Most new growers do not plan ahead for weather ro environmental conditions, and this is what presents most issues during an Outdoor grow.

        Reply
    20. I bought the blueberry auto flower seeds and thinking of growing them outside. I live in VA when will be the right time to start them so i can transplant them outside to get the best out of my plant.

      Reply
      • steven thompson,

        You do not want to plant your Auto flower plants outdoors until after any chance of frost is past. Check your local county planting advisory for Tomatoes, and Peppers. County Agenyt, and Professional Garden store mentors can help you out in your local area more precisely than I can. Happy Growing 🙂

        Reply
    21. Bobby,

      This all depends whether you are growing from seed or clone.

      Assuming you mean from seed, the answer would be; It all depends on your grow methods, amount of veg time, & lighting schedule.

      There is no guaranteed amount of days to finish a plant. However; Best way to estimate a finish time would be to look in the Seed Shop, and read the description of your genetics. Most all descriptions have a finish time listed

      Reply
    22. Elvis,

      5 feet apart is great, if you are planning on growing large bushy tree type plants. Given so little information I cannot elaborate beyond that. Happy growing.

      We have a great grow support forum and I advise you to join. We have many helpful knowledgeable members and grow experts.

      lw

      Reply
    23. First time grower have a plant that has been in flowering stage for 1week and it needs a transplant and food. I just placed my order for nutrients but need to give it something in mean tim. Will I have a problem transplanting at this time?

      Reply
    24. Dwana,

      It is best to transplant before flowering stage. Yes; You can transplant now,, and be sure to do it delicately. Damaging the roots at this stage will effect your final product and yield.

      Happy growing 🙂

      Reply
    25. I live in a hot climate (Greece) I have to use pots for growing outdoors. My plants are never taller than 12inches. Is this normal. How can I increase growth? By using a larger pot? I put one plant in a gallon pot thanks

      Reply
    26. Growing in a 1 gallon pot is going to mature your plant early. When the roots get bound up; The plant has the tendency to finish as if it is dying.

      Do the veg cycle in 1 gallon pot, and before flowering occurs, or you induce flower photo period. Transplant to 3 gallon pots. I guarantee you will double your yield 🙂

      Reply
    27. Hi Robert, first time grower, long time user. Now that my needs are medicinal I need to grow my own. I have started some of my own seeds and transplanted probably too soon to 2-3. Gallon containers. I am growing outdoors in Containers as a friend has had good luck with this method. Mobility being one. I have five plants about three inches tall in 2 gallon containers. You really schooled me on the moisture. I was overwatering. They look pretty good right now. Lots of sun in Southwest. Have my card and grow license. Will k be able to transplant these again into bigger containers (size?) in a couple weeks? I’m definitely going for your seeds and help. Thanks so much.

      Reply
      • After transplanting month 2 is it normal for leaves to droop and I have lights on for 12 hours should I turn them off after transplanting or leave on at 50%

        Reply
    28. Hi Robert. I was hoping you could tells the best way to go after terminating seeds using hydro systems. Do I still but them in soil or should I use another medium

      Reply
    29. Robert E. You best try to quit transplanting too early. This is a waste of medium and does nothing to help the plant. You need to fill one pot with roots before you transplant to a bigger pot.

      Perhaps you would like to join our support forum. Many growers there have a lot of experience and can help guide you through your grow.

      Reply
    30. Dino,

      We have no idea what you are talking about. Best thing is for you to join our support forum. You will be able to ask and get answers to all your questions there.

      Reply
    31. I am an outdoor grower, from start to finish, this year I am Starting my seeds indoors Then moving them out after a two week period. I am currently in week one and thanks to this article I am better aware of when and how to move them. I was also unaware of the Cotyledons falling off and didn’t recognize the time they did this out doors. This was quite interesting as I am watching this occur now.

      Reply
    32. The how to book is stuck at 50% . Will this clog up my computer and make it slow , if so I will probably just buy a beginner book .I’m only interested in growing 2 or3 plants . ………how long can I keep a plant in a 5 gal. bucket ? thank you

      Reply
    33. hi there just wondering if anyone knows if it’ll affect my plant if i smash the clay pot around it to transplant as its roots have taken over the whole pot…….

      Reply
      • Well, this is a nice little article about transplant from container to container.
        Where’s the stuff about going to ground and prepping the ground for the plant??
        Can one successfully transplant a small indoor plant outdoors into 90 degree weather??
        I’ve read of ‘hardening’ one’s plant for colder weather, but nothing about dealing with high temps.
        Should I throw some ice cubes into the feeding water or into the ground hole? Argh!

        Reply
    34. Hi, is a 5 gallon bucket a good container? Should I poke a few holes on the bottom? Do I have to use plant food? And when will buds start to appear?

      Reply
    35. HI–With Autoflowers do you start them in smaller pots & transplant or start them in a final pot. Like a 5-7 gal smart pot? Also can I start them indoor and then bring outside or should the whole process be kept to the final growing area–in or out? Not sure how they handle transplant/relocation since they are flowing right away.

      Reply
    36. Shelby Cobra,

      Most growers recommend starting and finishing auto flowers in the smae pot. I suggest you place your seedling (if starter in cubes of some sort) in a 3 gallon pot. This is all you will need for a quicker finishing auto flower plant. For more guidance, and support from many members; I suggest you join our friendly support forum. 🙂

      Reply
    37. I started with 4 plants 2 I could tell was male, I removed them. Now the 2 I have left 1 of them seam to be male…. is that normal for 1 out of 4 to be female?

      Reply
    38. My question is in relation to peat plugs, I have some plants growing hydroponic and some in the ground, but until reading this article, I was unaware I had to remove the netting for transplanting, all bar one is thriving in hydroponic ,so do I carefully take it out of the perlite and remove the net, as I gather the other have broken through it.

      Reply
      • Steve if plant is thriving, leave it alone. Plant roots should break through. I have seen them rip a small net pot apart. Just remember to apply thjs step in the future.

        Be happy, lw

        Reply
      • Diana,

        Thanks for your comment. Yes, this happens when articles are written in Dutch and translated to English.

        Reply
      • Diana,

        Thanks for sharing. Personally, I am legally blind and cannot edit after I post. I apologize for offending you with my typos. Have a great day 🙂 Peace

        Reply
    39. Funny thing!

      I am blind and just listened to this entire article on “textspeaker”. text to speech software, and I did not hear one off word. I thought the article was thorough and easy to comprehend.

      I would like to add the following concepts for Indoor, and “Sativa” growers.

      I find it real easy to go from peat pellet, transplant to 1 gallon pot, then to a 3-5 gallon smart cloth pot (depending on space available). This allows for easier control of plant size; Especially indoors, growing in tents.

      Size and length of harvest time can be controlled to some degree by limiting pot size. As mentioned above; “Leave a plant in a pot for too long and it stops growing”. A plant vegetated in a 1 gallon pot will grow into a nice healthy bush. For example: Transplanting into a 3 gallon pot allows the plant to thrive and build a strong root zone in a limited area. By limiting the final pot size, growers can “trick” the plant into finishing faster as it becomes root bound. Although limited in size, the plant will ripen normally, as long as you continue to provide adequate nutrition.

      In relation to Sativa:

      Apply the above methods of limiting pot size and after the seedling stage; PLace the Sativa into a 12/12 photo period from start to finish.

      As always, We wish you happy growing. Peace

      Reply
    40. I am uncertain as to the timing of germinating indoors and moving the plants outdoors given the light and darkness balance necessary for flowering. I did find a daylight duration table on line which tells me that the 12 hour balance point comes in the last week of September her in SE Washington. The seeds that I have are 50-55 (Sat/Ind: 80/20) and 60-67 (Sat/Ind: 20/80) days to harvest. That suggests that I could germinate them before mid-July and move them outdoors by that time or before. It seems that I could germinate them as early as March or April to achieve more vegetative growth. Is maximizing vegetative growth prior to the flowering stage an advantage to a better quality product or a higher quantity bud yield or both? Please advise. Thanks.

      Reply
    41. Hi bro! First of all, I want to say thank you for helping other people! Secondly, I want to ask a question about the transplant. All transplants from small to large pots need to be done during the growth period, or during the flowering period is also possible? Thank you in advance!

      Reply
      • Art,
        It is not recommended to transplant after flowering is induced, but can be done if the growers is experienced and causes little or no stress. Happy growing – I❤️GM

        Reply
    42. Hi there,
      Firstly thank you for all the info; I’m a first timer. Anyways I had a question. Say you have decide to grow in a greenhouse, and have successfully transplanted into the ground. 2 weeks go buy and the plants are thriving!! But there is a problem.. for unforeseen reasons I may have to move my plants. So to my question..can I dig them up and transplant them safely into 5 1/2 gallon planters pots?? Or is it too late and if I dig them up they die? Please help me if u can!!

      Reply
      • Mark,

        It is hard for us to tell you whether you can dig them up. You said you had to dig them up, so whatever risk there is is moot. I imagine you could move the plants but, no telling where the roots have traveled. Do some research on digging up a bush and moving it. Same thing. You have to dig away from the stem far enough so entire hole is slightly wider than the branches on the plant. 🙂

        Good Luck

        Reply
    43. hi,
      I have a question please, I planted my cannabis “2 sativa” and “1 indica” in a single pot and I want to separate and transplant them each, but I’m afraid that their root have been rounded the pot, an “if I separate each of them the root may damage” so please help me on how to separate and transplant them without causing any damage.
      2- can I transplant those seedlings when they are 4weeks old? (remember they are in the same pot “2 sativa” and “1 indica”).

      Reply
    44. I had to move a flowering purple granddaddy indoors because we started smelling it from inside our house and were worried someone else could smell it and recognize what/where it was coming from. I dug a 15 inch circle around the stem/base and went 18 inches deep. All went well!

      Reply
    45. After germination can’t I just plant the open seed into the 5 gallon bag I intend to grow in?
      It would save the repotting problem.

      Reply
    46. ILGM IS THE BEST SEED PLACE TO BUY SEEDS AND GET HELP GROWING THOSE SEEDS, BY FAR THE BEST!! I HAVE ORDERED FROM THEM MANY TIMES AND ONLY ONCE DID I HAVE ANY TROUBLE AND ILGM AND ROBERT HIMSELF TOOK CARE OF IT!! SO WHAT CAN YOU SAY ABOUT A COMPANY WITH THAT KIND OF CUSTOMER SERVICE BUT SAY THEY ARE THE BEST PERIOD!! TO BUY FROM ANYONE ELSE IS JUST STUPID WHEN YOU CAN BUY FROM THE BEST!! ALSO ILGM HAS THE BEST QUALITY SEEDS YOU CAN GET TO START WITH!! SO START WITH THE BEST SEEDS TO HAVE THE BEST BUD IN THE END!!

      Reply
    47. I just transplanted one of my Dr.who girls into a gallon pot …so a few of her under side leaves are turning yellow and Browning at the tip. Not alot just like 3leaves ..did I put her in shock? And if so can I save her

      Reply
      • Jen Jensen,
        That sounds like the soil you transplanted into was too hot. Best to join us at: support.ilovegrowingmarijuana.com so we can help you get on track 🙂

        Reply
    48. My first seeds germinated indoors. In a couple of days the stems are long and splinlyabout 4 inches with 4 small leaves. How do I handle these 3 plants.

      Reply
      • Donald,
        This is from inadequate lighting that is too far from the tops of the sprouts, so the plant reaches for the light until it stretches to the point of falling over. Get a T5 and place it 1-2″ above seedlings. They will come back. Next time, do this from the first sign of sprouting. 😉

        Reply
    49. All great words of wisdom! Thank you! Where do I go to find out about snipping the tops of the plant to encourage fullness, not height?

      Reply
    50. Hey guys, great article!! Thanks for the info…I have a couple of questions in regards to peat plugs:

      1. Based on this article, you said that “The peat plug mesh perimeter usually acts as a hindrance to the roots, and they stop growing as if they were contained in a plastic pot. This will cause them to stop growing as well”.
      Well, I was under the impression that this “mesh” was specially made so that the roots “follow their way” to the next pot once they are transplanted. Am I missing something here? Would you guys recommend to put the germinated seed directly into soil? Again, I heard this (peat plugs) was a great method for seedlings.

      2. Now, you guys also mentioned that ideally we should transplant seedlings once the plants’ roots have reached as far as they can grow within the constraints of their container. However, you also said that for peat plugs, I should transplant to a bigger container as soon as the root tendrils are emerging from underneath. My seedlings don’t even have their first two internodes so I’m unsure if I should transplant them to a bigger container now or if I should let my seedlings create a bigger and stronger root base.

      If so (transplanting), would you recommend that I transplant them into a cup or a larger pot instead? I’m worried that I cannot calculate week 1 of the growth stage correctly or give an incorrect amount of nutrients because I didn’t measure the times properly.

      Thank you in advance for the information provided.

      Reply
      • Andy,

        First. You never give seedlings nutrients!

        2. A container is not a peat pellet. So when roots appear transplant to a a cup or a 1 gallon nursery pot…whatever. Your choice. Never transplant into large container as 1.2 the medium will be wasted because roots will grow down and not out…
        Nutrients should not be given to a plant until it has 4-5 true alternating set of leaves.

        Always remove the cheese cloth around a peat pellet before transplanting. Hope this helps. 🙂

        Reply
    51. Getting ready to repot. Just want to say thanks for all the tips. Keeping my fingers crossed for a great crop.

      Reply
    52. JUST TRANSPLANTED MY 2 FT PLANT,WAS GROWING WELL,NOW THAT I MOVED IT,LEAVES ARE DROOPING,DID I KILL IT, WILL IT BOUNCE BACK TO ITS SMELLY SELF. HOPE I DIDNT KILL IT,ITS THE ONLY ONE THAT SURVIVED FROM YOU,THE REST WERENT WORTH A CRAP.NO ONE CARED.

      Reply
      • George,

        We guarantee all of our seeds and we all care. Kind of hard to read your jumbled “All Caps” but, I suggest you learn confidence by joining our forum at: support.ilovegrowingmarijuana.com Here in the blog we cannot answer as to whether you killed your plant. II do not see merely transplanting as the issue.

        Reply
      • Sean, If you can transplant a plant from pot to pot….If all the roots are ripped apart, you still would be able to re-plant the plant into a pot and let nature takes it’s course. You will lose some, while some parts may die off due to root damage or stress.

        Reply
      • Jack, Always keep the stem at the same height it was originally. You should not bury the stem at all. I also do not bury my tomato stems either.

        Reply
    53. I have a small pot not even a gallon and I wasn’t really intending to grow anything but I did and it wasn’t in soil just outside dirt and there’s currently 5 in one small pot how would I transplant them? Like would I separate them or what ?

      Reply
      • bella,

        It is hard to seperate roots. You can try but, in the future, never plant more than 1 cannabis seed ina pot.

        Reply
    54. What time of day is best to transplant? Morning, noon, or early evening? You say to avoid intense light for the first day, so i would assume sometime between noon and evening.

      Reply
      • Danny, I do not subscribe to the idea that transplanting has to be done any certain time, and I have never had a plant fail because it got full sun after transplanting because, you water them in. If you transplan at night, the plant will not be drinking. I would do it in the morning or anytime in the day that gives the plant some time, allowing the roots to uptsake moisture which will not happen in the dark.

        Reply
    55. Danny, Personally, I transplant whenever I get to it and I put them under my lamps in the growspace immediately. Different growers have different methods and ideals. I would not worry too much about when to transplant.. Outdoors under Sun might be different so I would want to get them out in the mmorning just at Sunrise.

      Reply
    56. FANIE, iF YOUR POT IS TOO SMALL; tRANSPLANT IT. pERHAPS YOU HSOULD JOIN OUR SUPPORT FORUM WHERE WE CAN TEACH YOU TO GROW SUCCESSFULLY FROM START TO FINISH. Oops (sorry about the “caps”)

      Reply
    57. I have a plant outside its growing taller, but there’s no buds yeti I could show you a picture you could probably tell

      Reply
      • Maureen, No! Autoflowers should be put in the size pot you want to grow in. They should not be transplanted or cloned or anything that would stress them and cause them to stunt. Stress causes autos to stunt.

        Reply
    58. I want to transplant an outside plant in the ground that is starting to bud to a 5 gallon container also outside to a sunnier spot. What are my chances of success?

      Reply
      • John, This idea will kill some roots and it is a crap shoot from there. You could try it and results will be proportionate to how well you preserve the established roots.

        Reply
    59. I was working in my vegetable garden this summer and decided to take a smoke break…well I found a seed and gave it a fling a week later there it was lol well it frosted a week ago and now it’s in bud what is the easiest way to trans plant it in doors…..thank you

      Reply
    60. Is it better,or does it matter what time of day or night you transplant!
      Should I transplant 2nd day of bloom) before sun or before sleep,which is best? Thanks

      Reply
      • You should transplant before bloom period, at least 2 weeks. Unless you induce flower period; You can tansplant and establish roots well before flowering. Happy growing

        Reply
      • Cynthia, Personally I transplant at the beginning of the light photo period so that I can see. There are varying opinions but, it really does not matter. Try to keep everything as simple as possible for the best results, when learning to grow. Happy growing.

        Reply
    61. im a newbie to growing indoors and id like to try the scrog technique but with the screen being so low it seems like it would be hard to pot up. Would it be ok to go from a starter container straight to a 7 gallon pot To start topping and get the plant under the screen?

      Reply
    62. hello!:) im starting seeds off with rapid rooters after a 24 hour soak for the seeds, and a 7 hour soak for the rooters, ill be putting the fresh seedlings in mothers earth coco mix filled non woven cloth feeding bags of the appropriate size , my question is once the beginning bag size is grown to its limit and it is time to transplant, i was going to go to my 7 gallon smart pots , the brand of feed bahs i purchased state they do not need to be removed for the transplant, that roots will easily go through it and it will biodegrade , in your experience does this statement hold any weight?

      Reply
    63. What if is wrong with the roots if they are not white but have a brownish tint to them? One of my plants had that and the other three are growing great and that one is not. However when it’s sprouted it looked different than any other plant I have ever seen and I really don’t know what to do for it.

      Reply
    64. My White Widow is in its 3rd-4th week of the bloom cycle and it is a female non-autoflowering. I’m growing it indoors in a 2’x2′ grow tent and it’s doing great. Some LST has caused it to develop upwards of 50 buds. It’s in a 3-gallon cloth-type pot so water seepage is great. But, I’m worried about it getting root-bound.

      Is it too late to consider transplanting to a 5-gallon container? I don’t want to put it into irreversible shock at this point in its grow stage but I also don’t want problems that might arise from it being root-bound.

      Any thoughts?

      Reply
    65. Thank you for the tips.
      I have 2 plants that I started in a Aerogarden (hydro) I need to know if it is OK to move them into the soil (pots) and move them into the outdoors. Do you have any tips and recommendations?
      Thank You

      JB

      Reply
    66. Hi Robert,
      I’ve got multiple plants in 5 gallon fabric Smart Pots that are well on their way. 3 pots – 1 with 4 plants – 1 with 5 – and 1 with 6. How can I separate and transplant them successfully without damaging them? Are 5 gallon pots a good size to be a permanent home for them? And what are peat plugs?
      Thank you!

      Reply
    67. Is it too late to transplant if it’s on the verge of flowering? I’m afraid it’s run out of room and needs a bigger pot….

      Reply
    68. I want to move my mature plants just starting to flower from their outdoor bed into large pots that will be outdoors in a sunnier location Can I?

      Reply
    69. I have seedlings that are “leggy” and not upright. Should I transplant them so the stem is below the ground level to give them more support or stake them?

      Reply
    70. I started my plants in an aero garden i transplanted the three plants to 5 gallon buckets in order to get roots apart I had to cut them. Do you think this will hurt plants?

      Reply
    71. I have 3 cannabis stems actually flowering way too early but am wondering if I should transfer them because right now they are in a flowerbed type planter. I had no idea it was actually going to work let alone start flowering so early. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

      Reply
    72. I started my clone off in a big pot and I have an indoor how would I switch over to a 5 gallon pot for a 14 inch pot

      Reply
    73. Can you tranplant a plant thats been growing out doors for 2 months and about 4 ft high and 4 foot around in the ground

      Reply